Armchair Critic

Those that have done nothing in life are not qualified to judge those that are doing something.

In the story of the talents found in Matthew 25:14-30, you discover three individuals, two of them used what they had and were given more, however one buried what he had and lost it. If you read the first two responses, you discover that each of them spoke a total of sixteen words. The one that did nothing with what he was given spoke forty-three words. The conclusion: He that speaks the most does the least and requires the most attention.

President Teddy Roosevelt said, “It’s not the critic who counts, not the person who points out where the doer of the deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes up short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasm, the devotion, and spends himself or herself in a worthy cause: who at best knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement: and at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his or her place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

It takes zero effort to criticize, no experience, no background, and no degree. On the other hand, a life that is well-lived, and lived for others has few apologies to make and is filled with energy, resources, rich in friends and good deeds!

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